Environment, Government and Canada

Environment and Climate Change Canada is one of the few government dedicated sites environemnt-canadathat includes information on a variety of enviromental topics that the government has tied in relations with.

ECCC includes basic information on environmental topics such as pollution, sustainable development, various ecosystems etc. while also including a multitude of different acts and regulations that often protect the environment from human harm.

If you’re looking for the most in depth/ set in stone items regarding the rules and laws of the environment than this website is perfect for finding and understanding them.

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Evergreen

Evergreen is a not-for-profit dedicated to making cities flourish that wasevg-logo-eng-rgb established in 1991, their main goal being to create healthier cities that incorporate nature within living spaces.

So far they’ve helped build school grounds, community programs helping on water,housing and transportation issues and creating economical environmentally healthy social work-spaces for people to use on the daily.

Seen below is their Evergreen Brick works Centre, a community centre that was converted from the old Don Valley Brick Works, a heavily used factory that had created over 43 million bricks annually for use in Canada and in 1984 the building was abandoned and eventually Evergreen took a hold of it and created the centre as it is now. It’s open daily and hosts a variety of different activities such as nature based camps, gardening workshops, exhibits, holding conferences and even a weekend Farmers Market.

They offer volunteering options and accept donations and any help that they can get, if you want any news from them you can check out their website by click the evergreen image above.

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Wildlife Preservation Canada

WPC deals with taking care of endangered animals, making sure that their DNA stays alive wpc_newlogowhile maintaining their habitats and using various scientific techniques in order to do so.

They base their plan on “Urgency of Need” and implement many different ways of helping animals such as conservation breeding and introduction so as to not to accidentally domestic or cause any more issues when trying to repopulate a species.

They have succeeded in bring back low population animals (from numbers as low as 6) all the way to hundreds.

They often hold events and will post them regularly on their site. Donations are available to be given if you so chose to do so as they are a not-for-profit organization any help is appreciated.

Click on the image if you’d like to learn more about them.

WWF- Canada


wwf-logo.jpgFor half a century, WWF has worked to protect the future of nature. WWF (World Wildlife Fund) is Canada’s largest international conservation organization with the active support of more than 150,000 Canadians. We connect the power of a strong global network to on-the-ground conservation efforts across Canada, with offices in Vancouver, Prince Rupert, Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, Halifax, St. John’s, Iqaluit and Inuvik. Our Mission: To stop the degradation of the planet’s natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature, by:

  • Ensuring that the use of renewable natural resources is sustainable.
  • Promoting the reduction of pollution and wasteful consumption.
  • conserving the world’s biological diversity

Go visit this site to find out more about wild-lives:

http://www.wwf.ca/

About the Canadian Wildlife Federation

11852.jpgThe Canadian Wildlife Federation’s mission is to conserve and inspire the conservation of Canada’s wildlife and habitats for the use and enjoyment of all.

The Canadian Wildlife Federation conducts its activities through a cooperative approach – working with people, corporations, non-government organizations, and governments to inspire collaboration in achieving wildlife conservation. We will use the best available science-based information to develop our policies, programs and communications. CWF prides itself in being accountable and transparent in fulfilling our mission.

Fore more info. visit: http://cwf-fcf.org/

SPECIES: Some of the Beauty That Lives on the Moraine

The unusual diversity of faces inhabiting the Oak Ridges Moraine is due largely to the Moraine’s vast array of habitats ranging from old growth forest, to kettle lakes, to the rare tallgrass prairie.

 

                                Meadowlarkormlt-meadowlark.jpg

The Eastern Meadowlark was once a common bird of spring in Ontario. It is known by its penetrating whistle, said to sound like ‘spring is here’

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                          White-Tailed Deerormlt-whitetaildeer (1)

The best known and most common of Ontario’s large mammals, the white-tailed deer is our only species of small deer and our most common. Most often seen in the early morning or late afternoon, white-tailed deer tend to have a home range of between one and three hundred acres.

 

                         Red-tailed Hawkormlt-redtailhawk.jpg

Red-tailed Hawk is one of our most common hawks, recognizable by the distinctive rusty reddish feathers in its fanned tail. Its incredibly expansive range includes almost all of North America from arctic tree line to desert. While they might not always be seen, they are often heard, recognizable by their rasping 2-part descending screech.

 

Help save the Salamanders

Salamanders are in a terrible crisis. Many salamander species are disappearing from the wild. Unfortunately, due to their secretive lifestyles, salamanders are not commonly seen by people. This means the decline in salamanders largely goes unnoticed – even as species become extirpated (locally extinct and exterminated). Salamanders are further at risk due to the fact that few conservation groups are solely devoted to their recovery, and the general public is largely indifferent to saving ”slimy amphibians.”1340120697.jpg

How can you help?

  • If you encounter a salamander in the wild (whether in land or water) admire it by observation only. Salamanders have very absorbent skin and the oils and salts from human hands can seriously harm them. Chemicals on the hands such as insect repellents, sunblock, and lotions can further cause damage. The risk of skin damage that could result in secondary skin infections, as well as bone and muscle injuries from struggling are also a threat. For these reasons salamanders should never be mauled or handled by novices. Unfortunately, some people attempt to ‘rescue’ the salamanders that they find. In doing so, they are only capturing the animals and removing them from their natural habitat. A small salamander on its own does not need to be rescued. These animals are capable of caring for themselves. Therefore, a tiny salamander is not lost or abandoned by its parents. They do not need to be rescued from the cold either, these animals are amphibians not reptiles, and as such are very cold hardy. Salamanders have even been observed walking over snow or ice in early March. If you find a salamander simply leave it alone, just admire it by observation, and do not capture it. It does not need your help!

check out the link below to seek more information on how can you help conserve the Salamander species:

https://www.savethesalamanders.com/how-you-can-help.html