Conservation Council

 

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Our Vision

Conservation Council of New Brunswick believes the future of all life depends on bringing human activity in balance with ecological limits.

Our Mission

Conservation Council of New Brunswick is a non-profit organization that creates awareness of environmental problems and advances practical solutions through research, education and interventions.

Our History

The idea for a provincial environmental organization for New Brunswick was first proposed in January 1969 at the annual meeting of the New Brunswick Institute of Agrology by soil scientist Kenneth Langmaid. With a $50 grant from the institute, Ken joined with a group of other scientists, writers, and journalists to found the Conservation Council of New Brunswick on October 18, 1969. Kenneth Langmaid served as our first president. The original provisional directors included Robert Strang, Gerald Shaw, and Austin Squires.

In 1979, the Conservation Council hired its first Executive Director, Dana Silk. Dana was succeeded by Janice Harvey in 1983. In 1985, David Coon joined Janice to serve as Policy Director. By 1990, the organization had grown such that it was organizing its work into programs, beginning with its Marine Conservation Program. Sustainable Agriculture and Environmental Health Programs were added in the mid-1990?s. These were followed by the establishment of Forest Conservation, Climate Action, Health Watch Programs, and most recently, Buy Local NB, Freshwater Protection, and Learning Outside.

If you’d like to learn more about CCC please click on the image above.

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Canadian Network for Environmental Education and Communication

1ffa3bb62aThe Canadian Network for Environmental Education and Communication (EECOM)/ Le réseau canadien d’éducation et de communication relatives à l’environnement, is Canada’s only national, bilingual, charitable network for environmental learning (EL). EECOM works strategically and collaboratively to advance EL to ensure Canadians are environmentally literate, engaged in environmental stewardship and contributing to a healthy, sustainable future. At a time when the environment and sustainability issues are a clear priority to Canadians, EECOM’s role is more important than ever before.

EECOM works with multi-disciplinary, multi-regional, multi-cultural and multi-sectoral partner individuals and organizations from across Canada. Reflecting the fundamental importance of networking and collaborating among regions, cultures and sectors in EL, EECOM’s network is comprised of teachers, students, academics, community leaders, nature interpreters, youth, and business leaders. Current members and associates include representatives and decision makers from provincial, territorial or national environmental learning organizations, from a variety of sectors including: all levels of government, NGOs, universities, K-12 schools, private sector, industry, autonomous workers and retirees.

If you’d like to learn more please feel free to click the image above to be directed to their website.

Canadian Environmental LAW Association

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The Canadian Environmental Law Association (CELA) is a non-profit, public interest organization established in 1970 to use existing laws to protect the environment and to advocate environmental law reforms. Funded by Legal Aid Ontario, CELA is one of 76 community legal clinics located across Ontario, 18 of which offer services in specialized areas of the law. CELA also undertakes additional educational and law reform projects funded by government and private foundations. To find out more see our most recent Annual Report.

Clinic Mandate

The Canadian Environmental Law Association (CELA) is a specialty community legal clinic providing services to low income individuals and disadvantaged communities across Ontario in environmental law matters. CELA was established in 1970, funded as an Ontario specialty legal aid clinic since 1978, and incorporated as a not-for-profit corporation without share capital pursuant to the laws of Canada in 1982, providing legal aid services to the community without fees for service. CELA services include environmental law legal services, including representation before a variety of courts and tribunals as well as assistance to individuals representing themselves, summary advice, law reform and public legal education.

CELA’s objectives are:

  • To provide equitable access to justice to those otherwise unable to afford representation for their environmental problems;
  • To advocate for comprehensive laws, standards and policies that will protect and enhance public health and environmental quality in Ontario and throughout Canada;
  • To increase public participation in environmental decision-making;
  • To work with the public and public interest groups to foster long-term sustainable solutions to environmental concerns and resource use;
  • To prevent harm to human and ecosystem health through application of precautionary measures.

In accomplishing all of these objectives, primary recognition is given to CELA’s mandate to assist low-income people and disadvantaged communities.

Ontario Environment Industries

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Established in 1991, ONEIA is the business association representing the interests of the environment industry in Ontario. Our network of thousands of contacts includes key people at environmental technology, product and service companies, law, investment and insurance firms, institutes, universities and governments. Through their innovation and experience in Ontario and around the world, Ontario’s environment industry provides markeat-driven solutions for society’s most pressing environmental problems.

 

Key stats on Ontario’s Environment Industry (according to Statistics Canada)

  • Includes more than 3,000 environment companies in Ontario

  • Offers world-class technology and environmental services

  • Employs more than 65,000 highly trained people

  • Generates annual revenues in excess of $8 billion

  • Creates exports with a value approaching $1-billion

Leading Edge Innovation

Ontario’s environment industry develops environmentally innovative and economically efficient technologies and management solutions for a wide range of needs.

Advanced solutions for air and water pollution, solid waste, and management of hazardous materials, site remediation and decontamination, and others have been developed and commercialized by Ontario companies.

World-Class Technologies

Ontario’s environment industry offers the world’s best environmental technologies. Whatever the challenge and whatever the need, Ontario’s environment industry can offer a range of solutions that are cost-effective and environmentally sound. From municipal water treatment to the most advanced renewable energy technology, Ontario companies offer solutions that set a world standard.

 

Canadian Geographic

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A well established and long running magazine company that deals with a host of nature related topics within Canada, Canadian Geographic provides genuine news and experts from researchers, wildlife scientists, enthusiasts and some of the more important key players within Canada’s nature sector.

Canadian Geographic is available monthly either electronically or by mail and delivers all of the most high quality recent stories and information from across Canada on topics such as the environment, energy, education. science and technology and if you’d rather not pay for the subscriptions, they still have lots of posts that get updated periodically that have information regarding many different current issues in the environment.

Clink on the image above if you’d like to see and learn more.

Oak Ridges Moraine Land And Trust

When the glaciers of the Wisconsin ice age retreated some 11,000 years ago they left the giant ridge of sediment we now know as the Oak Ridges Moraine. Southern Ontario was a bleak and chilly place.

Woolly Mammoths roamed the perimeter of giant lakes, many times larger than our current “Great Lakes”. At this time, the Oak Ridges Moraine (ORM) would have looked like arctic tundra, with only a few small coniferous trees and sparse vegetation able to grow in the stark rocky landscape.

The forests of the Moraine grew and changed, ultimately evolving into a complex ecosystem that sustained a diversity of wildlife under a towering canopy of oaks, sugar maples, beech, and many other tree species.

The Moraine has been shaped by the forces of nature and the forces of human occupation. What happens in the future will depend on understanding the past and by acting now to find a course of sustainability.

Want to learn more about the history of Oak Ridges Moraine?

visit the website below:

http://www.oakridgesmoraine.org/occupants.html

Research on the moraine

In 1829, John Bigsby conducted the first investigation of the moraine. He noted the elevation, and styled the area Oak Ridge, identifying the portion of moraine north of Toronto. The moraine’s extent was not established until 1863 when William Logan conducted the Geological Survey of Canada.

Taylor formally defined the landform as the Oak Ridges Moraine in 1913. He described its extent to be from King and Maple in the west to the Trent River in the east. He also proposed that its origin was overlapping, interlobate glaciation retreat, between the Lake Ontario Lobe and the older Lake Simcoe Lobe. This has become the accepted explanation for the moraine’s development, through research in the 1970s suggested the moraine may not be interlobate.

Research conducted in the 1990s revealed that the moraine has multiple origins: its eastern area has subglacial depositions (Gorrell and McCrae, 1993); early parts of the moraine were deposited in an esker (Brennand and Shaw, 1994); and that the moraine is not continuous, but is composed of multiple depositional environments: subglacial, ice-marginal and proglacial lacustrine (Barnett et al., 1998).

Current research efforts on the moraine are quite extensive. Because of the political implications of development on the moraine, and because its aquifers are a source of potable water for numerous communities, both federal and provincial governments have invested resources towards research on the moraine. The Geological Survey of Canada and Ontario Geological Survey both investigate hydrostratigraphy and hydrology throughout the moraine.

Palaeo-Indian hunter-gatherers were in this area between 10,000 – 7000 BC. The oldest artifact found in what is now Richmond Hill, Ontario, from these people, was a stone scraper about 40 mm long, at the Mortson Site, near Leslie Street and 19th Avenue. Other artifacts were found in a settlement site on the eastern shore of Lake Wilcox.

Archaic Iroquois artifacts c. 1800 BC have also been found at the Silver Stream site, near the headwaters of the Rouge River on Leslie Street just north of Major Mackenzie Drive, and at the Esox site, on the eastern shore of Lake Wilcox.