Nature Conservancy Canada

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The Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) is Canada’s leading national land conservation organization. A private, non-profit organization, we partner with individuals, corporations, other non-profit organizations and governments at all levels to protect our most important natural treasures — the natural areas that sustain Canada’s plants and wildlife. We secure properties (through donation, purchase, conservation agreement and the relinquishment of other legal interests in land) and manage them for the long term.

Since 1962, NCC and our partners have helped to conserve more than 2.8 million acres (1.1 million hectares) of ecologically significant land from coast to coast.

Vision of Nature Conservancy Canada :

  • Nature Conservancy Canada envisions a world in which Canadians conserve nature in all its diversity, and safeguard the lands and waters that sustain life.

Mission of Nature Conservancy Canada :

  • The Nature Conservancy of Canada leads and inspires others to join us in creating a legacy for future generations by conserving important natural areas and biological diversity across all regions of Canada.

Values of Nature Conservancy Canada :

  • Durable Conservation Outcomes
  • Evidence-Based Decision-Making
  • Respect For Nature and People
  • Integrity First
  • Conservation Through Collaboration and Cooperation

If you are interested in more stories of Nature Conservancy Canada, visit http://www.natureconservancy.ca/.

 

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Energy Probe

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Energy Probe is a consumer and environmental research team, active in the fight against nuclear power, and dedicated to resource conservation, economic efficiency, and effective utility regulation.

Current Priorities of Energy Probe :

  • Restore strong regulation in monopolized markets, such as those involving gas pipelines and electricity grids
  • Promote competition in naturally competitive markets
  • Promote a clean energy future
  • Stop nuclear expansion
  • Explain that global warming alarmism promotes an all-electric society of uneconomic and environmentally destructive  dams, industrial wind farms and nuclear reactors
  • Protect consumer interests when considering energy purchases and options

Energy Probe’s Funding :

  • Energy Probe depends overwhelmingly on individual donations and commercial activities for its operation
  • Individual donations include receipted monies and unreceipted pro bono work, including from whistle-blowers, lawyers and scientists

For more details about Energy Probe’s projects and goals, visit https://ep.probeinternational.org/.

International Joint Commission (IJC)

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The International Joint Commission (IJC) is an international organization created by the Boundary Waters Treaty, signed by Canada and the United States in 1909.

The International Joint Commission prevents and resolves disputes between the United States of America and Canada under the 1909 Boundary Waters Treaty and pursues the common good of both countries as an independent and objective advisor to the two governments.

In particular, the Commission rules upon applications for approval of projects affecting boundary or transboundary waters and may regulate the operation of these projects; it assists the two countries in the protection of the transboundary environment, including the implementation of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement and the improvement of transboundary air quality; and it alerts the governments to emerging issues along the boundary that may give rise to bilateral disputes.

Canada and the United States each appoint three of the six IJC Commissioners, including one chair from each country. The two chairs serve concurrently. The Commissioners are appointed by the highest level of government in each country, but once appointed they do not represent the national governments; they operate at arm’s length. The Commissioners traditionally work by consensus to find solutions that are in the best interest of both countries. The Commissioners are supported by U.S. and Canadian Section offices in Washington, D.C., and Ottawa, Ontario.

The IJC has established more than 20 boards and task forces to help meet its responsibilities along the Canada-U.S. boundary. Board and task force members are drawn equally from both countries and are expected to work in their professional capacities, not as representatives of an organization or region.

Missions and Mandates :

  • Boundary Waters Treaty
  • Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. 2012
  • Rules of Procedures
  • Guiding Principles

Activities :

  • Historical Highlights
  • Dockets
  • Reports and Publications

IJC Team :

  • Commissioners
  • Staff
  • Boards and Task Forces

For more information about IJC, visit http://www.ijc.org.

Windfall Centre

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Established in 1998 by Brent R. Kopperson, Windfall Ecology Centre is a non-profit social enterprise dedicated to building sustainable communities. The creation of Windfall was inspired by a vision of healthy communities, where economic, social, and environmental needs achieve balance through social innovation, community partnership, and community action. The Centre’s activities focus on empowering communities to create lasting wealth in a carbon constrained 21st century.

What Do They Do?

  • Energy Efficiency
  • Transportation
  • Solar Services
  • Windfall Ecology Festival
  • Water Protection
  • Advocacy
  • Education
  • Sustainability Planning

York Region Environmental Alliance

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YREA, The York Region Environmental Alliance (YREA) is a not-for-profit, registered charitable organization (#84559 0553 RR0001). Our hands-on volunteer board of directors hails from the far reaches of York Region and approves, oversees, and is directly involved with YREA projects. We have a dedicated membership and volunteer base. Three part-time staff administer our day-to-day activities. The organization is formed in 1999 to initially campaign against the cosmetic use of pesticides, the York Region Environmental Alliance (YREA) has continually expanded its mandate to address ecological issues that impact our health and the health of our environment.

Through their mandate, they strive to :

 

  • Identify and raise awareness of environmental concerns which impact York Region and beyond
  • Inspire and initiate ecologically sound and sustainable solutions to common community concerns that protect and improve the quality of the environment of York Region
  • Promote healthy and environmentally sustainable personal lifestyle choices
  • Effectively influence public policy and community behavioural changes

For more information about York Region Environmental Alliance, visit yrea.org.

 

 

Conservation Council

 

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Our Vision

Conservation Council of New Brunswick believes the future of all life depends on bringing human activity in balance with ecological limits.

Our Mission

Conservation Council of New Brunswick is a non-profit organization that creates awareness of environmental problems and advances practical solutions through research, education and interventions.

Our History

The idea for a provincial environmental organization for New Brunswick was first proposed in January 1969 at the annual meeting of the New Brunswick Institute of Agrology by soil scientist Kenneth Langmaid. With a $50 grant from the institute, Ken joined with a group of other scientists, writers, and journalists to found the Conservation Council of New Brunswick on October 18, 1969. Kenneth Langmaid served as our first president. The original provisional directors included Robert Strang, Gerald Shaw, and Austin Squires.

In 1979, the Conservation Council hired its first Executive Director, Dana Silk. Dana was succeeded by Janice Harvey in 1983. In 1985, David Coon joined Janice to serve as Policy Director. By 1990, the organization had grown such that it was organizing its work into programs, beginning with its Marine Conservation Program. Sustainable Agriculture and Environmental Health Programs were added in the mid-1990?s. These were followed by the establishment of Forest Conservation, Climate Action, Health Watch Programs, and most recently, Buy Local NB, Freshwater Protection, and Learning Outside.

If you’d like to learn more about CCC please click on the image above.

Canadian Environmental Protection Act

What we examined

The Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999) is Canada’s principal federal environmental statut

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e. It is intended to protect the environment and

human health by mitigating and managing risks posed by harmful substances. CEPA 1999 and its regulations govern a variety of environmental matters, including toxic substances, cross-border air and water pollution, and waste disposal. The Act also imposes requirements for pollution prevention planning and emergency plans, and it regulates the inter-provincial and international movement of hazardous wastes and recyclable materials.

Environment Canada’s enforcement program is aimed at ensuring that individuals, companies, and government agencies comply with the pollution prevention and conservation goals of environmental and wildlife protection Acts and regulations, including CEPA 1999. The enforcement of CEPA 1999 is carried out by the Department’s Environmental Enforcement Directorate, comprising a national office and five regional offices across Canada whose activities include monitoring and enforcing regulatory compliance.

We examined whether Environment Canada’s enforcement program was well managed to adequately enforce compliance with CEPA 1999. We assessed whether the Department has applied a risk-based approach to plan its enforcement activities and target the greatest threats to human health and the environment; enforced the law in a fair, predictable, and consistent way, as the Act requires; measured the results of its enforcement activities; and acted on identified opportunities for improvement.

Audit work for this chapter was completed on 11 October 2011.

Why it’s important

CEPA 1999 states that the protection of the environment is essential to the well-being of Canadians and that the primary purpose of the Act is to contribute to sustainable development through pollution prevention. According to Environment Canada, environmental laws alone are not enough to guarantee a cleaner, better environment. These laws also need to be enforced. Enforcing CEPA 1999 is therefore an important part of protecting the health of Canadians, biodiversity, and the quality of Canada’s air, soil, and water. According to Environment Canada, enforcement of the law can encourage behavioral changes needed to protect the environment and human health by preventing and managing risks posed by toxic and other harmful substances.

The law is a very important one in keeping the peace within the Ontario government in regards to environmental issues and should be regarded when building any new type of structure as it will in some form impact the area around it. If you’d like to read more on the Law, click on the image above.