Phyllis Rawlinson Park

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Phyllis Rawlinson Park is Richmond Hill’s largest Oak Ridges Moraine park. The land was donated to Richmond Hill by Phyllis Rawlinson, a long-time resident of the Town.

Special Features That The Park Includes :

  • A community garden
  • An off-leash dog area
  • Celebration Forest
  • Robert Holland Interpretive Centre
  • George Forster House

Robert Holland Interpretive Centre :

Robert Holland Interpretive Centre is a place where exploring outdoors and participating in environmental activities are available, which is inside Phyllis Rawlinson Park. The programs the centre runs are :

  • Environmental Studies
  • Native Studies
  • Pioneer Life
  • Tree Planting
  • Trail Maintenance
  • Habitat Construction
  • Interpretive Hikes

To check more interesting features of Phyllis Rawlinson Park, Visit https://www.richmondhill.ca/en/things-to-do/Phyllis-Rawlinson-Park.aspx.

Oak Ridges Moraine: land use designations

This data set was created to provide land use information on the Oak Ridges Moraine and is the basis for Ontario Regulation 140/02.

The data was digitized at 1:10,000 or better using 0.5 metre air photos, MNR, DMTI, Upper and Lower-tier Official Plans and digital vector layers.

To view, click the link below:

https://www.javacoeapp.lrc.gov.on.ca/geonetwork/srv/en/main.home?uuid=4e23f1bd-ddc7-4075-941f-ad2a2260435b

Oak Ridges Moraine Land And Trust

When the glaciers of the Wisconsin ice age retreated some 11,000 years ago they left the giant ridge of sediment we now know as the Oak Ridges Moraine. Southern Ontario was a bleak and chilly place.

Woolly Mammoths roamed the perimeter of giant lakes, many times larger than our current “Great Lakes”. At this time, the Oak Ridges Moraine (ORM) would have looked like arctic tundra, with only a few small coniferous trees and sparse vegetation able to grow in the stark rocky landscape.

The forests of the Moraine grew and changed, ultimately evolving into a complex ecosystem that sustained a diversity of wildlife under a towering canopy of oaks, sugar maples, beech, and many other tree species.

The Moraine has been shaped by the forces of nature and the forces of human occupation. What happens in the future will depend on understanding the past and by acting now to find a course of sustainability.

Want to learn more about the history of Oak Ridges Moraine?

visit the website below:

http://www.oakridgesmoraine.org/occupants.html

Quick Facts and Figures About Oak Ridges Moraine

Small Map of the Oak Ridges Moraine

The Moraine has an enormous amount of biodiversity. There are:

  • 1,171 plant species
  • 125 species of moss
  • 166 breeding bird species (and more through migratory seasons)
  • 30 species of reptiles and amphibians
  • 51 mammal species
  • 73 fish species
  • 74 species of butterflies
  • 70 dragonflies and damselfly species
  • 88 species are provincial or national species at risk and 466 are moraine rare (Canada as a whole has 71,500 species of plants and animals, with approximately 422 species at risk)

There are 72 life and earth science Areas of Natural and Scientific Interest (ANSI’s) covering 15% of the moraine and 82 Environmentally Significant Areas (ESAs)

For more information about the Oak Ridges Moraine

 

SPECIES: Some of the Beauty That Lives on the Moraine

The unusual diversity of faces inhabiting the Oak Ridges Moraine is due largely to the Moraine’s vast array of habitats ranging from old growth forest, to kettle lakes, to the rare tallgrass prairie.

 

                                Meadowlarkormlt-meadowlark.jpg

The Eastern Meadowlark was once a common bird of spring in Ontario. It is known by its penetrating whistle, said to sound like ‘spring is here’

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                          White-Tailed Deerormlt-whitetaildeer (1)

The best known and most common of Ontario’s large mammals, the white-tailed deer is our only species of small deer and our most common. Most often seen in the early morning or late afternoon, white-tailed deer tend to have a home range of between one and three hundred acres.

 

                         Red-tailed Hawkormlt-redtailhawk.jpg

Red-tailed Hawk is one of our most common hawks, recognizable by the distinctive rusty reddish feathers in its fanned tail. Its incredibly expansive range includes almost all of North America from arctic tree line to desert. While they might not always be seen, they are often heard, recognizable by their rasping 2-part descending screech.

 

YR Student Water Conservation Program

Image result for york regionYR Student Water Conservation Program is a program runs by York Region, involving students in York Region. Student Water Conservation Program does different kinds of projects such as Beach Water Testing, Drinking Water Source Protection and etc., all by students and managers of York Region. York Region Student Water Conservation Program is very significant in a way that students are being responsible by their own wills of protecting the environment of their neighbor, and the solutions to the pre-existing problems are being researched by running different projects. For more information of York Region Student Water Conservation Program, visit (http://www.york.ca/wps/portal/yorkhome/environment/yr/waterandwastewater/studentwaterconservationprograms/)

Richmond Hill Water Services

TTown of Richmond Hill Logohe water services in Richmond Hill is managed by a rural government of Richmond Hill. In Richmond Hill website, it allows people to check out information about the water services such as Water Bill, Water Quality and etc.. Oak Ridges Moraine has a very close relationship with water of Richmond Hill, because one of the most important function of Oak Ridges Moraine is as a water recharge/discharge area-sustaining the health of the many watersheds, which originate in the Moraine and directly provides drinking water to over 250,000 people. For more information about water of Richmond Hill Water Services, visit https://www.richmondhill.ca/en/our-services/Water-Services.aspx.